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AMERICAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ANNOUNCES EXPANDED 2019–20 SEASON WITH CONCERTS AT CARNEGIE HALL, ALICE TULLY HALL, AND SYMPHONY SPACE

OCTOBER 31, 2019 – MARCH 12, 2020

Music Director Leon Botstein to Conduct Four Concerts Including Tributes to Duke Ellington, Beethoven’s 250th Birthday, and J.S. Bach’s Four Sons

ASO Renews Successful Series at Symphony Space

Soloists Include:
Pianist Lucas Debargue; Sopranos Janai Brugger and Amanda Woodbury; Mezzo-Sopranos Maya Lahyani and Taylor Raven; Tenors Cooper Nolan and Jack Swanson; and Baritones Alexander Birch Elliott and Chris Kenney; Plus Jazz Pianist Marcus Roberts and the Marcus Roberts Trio, and American Vocalist Catherine Russell

New York, NY, June 25, 2019 American Symphony Orchestra announced the 58th season of its three-concert Vanguard series at Carnegie Hall, now expanded to include an additional performance at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall. The season also marks the return of the Orchestra’s popular series to New York City’s Symphony Space—which originally took place between 1998 and 2015—with a performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in conjunction with the ASO’s celebration of the great composer’s 250th birthday. This series combines complete concerts of well-known, major orchestral works with interactive educational demonstrations. The full 2019–20 season runs from October 31, 2019 through March 12, 2020.

Following the success of the Orchestra’s 2017 performance of The Apostles, the ASO season opens on October 31 with Edward Elgar’s massive choral work The Kingdom, the second of Elgar’s incomplete trilogy of oratorios. The concert series continues with Sons of Bach, which will present rarely-performed works by four fellows who followed in the footsteps of their famous father, J.S. Bach (December 19, 2019). In honor of the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth, Beyond Beethoven will examine how the composer’s music inspired others with a program of works by Liszt, Spohr, and Reger. The performance will also celebrate the 100th anniversary of an often-overlooked 20th-century master, Galina Ustvolskaya (January 31, 2020). The Carnegie Hall season culminates with Duke Ellington, a tribute to the genre-defying genius of Ellington, with an evening including two world premiere arrangements by Marcus Roberts of New World A-Comin’ and Three Black Kings for Jazz Trio and Large Orchestra (March 12, 2020).

Music director Leon Botstein will provide the musical context for each of the concert programs in lively, 30-minute Conductor’s Notes Q&A sessions. These discussions, animated learning opportunities for both concert-goers and music connoisseurs alike, begin one hour before each concert and are free for all ticket holders.

The Kingdom
Thursday, October 31, 2019 at Carnegie Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Conductor’s Notes Q&A 7 PM
Concert 8 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Janai Brugger, soprano
Maya Lahyani, mezzo–soprano
Cooper Nolan, tenor
Alexander Birch Elliott, baritone
Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
Edward Elgar: The Kingdom

The opening program presents the second work in Elgar’s incomplete trilogy of oratorios, which begins with the calling of twelve young men (The Apostles). The Kingdom explores the start of the apostles’ mission on earth, ultimately unfolding at the end of time (The Last Judgement). This immense choral work—set to scriptural references from the New Testament—focuses on the apostle Peter and the beginnings of the Christian Church in Jerusalem. Soloists feature soprano Janai Brugger, one of Opera News’ top 25 “brilliant young artists”; mezzo-soprano Maya Lahyani, who has sung more than 70 performances at the Metropolitan Opera; tenor Cooper Nolan, praised by Musical America for his “bright, shining, tenor”; and baritone Alexander Birch Elliot, who debuted this season at both the Houston Grand Opera and the Metropolitan Opera as Zurga in Les Pêcheurs de Perles.

Tickets, priced at $25–$65, go on sale September 3 at carnegiehall.org, CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800 or the box office at 57th St & 7th Ave.

Sons of Bach
Thursday, December 19, 2019 at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center
Conductor’s Notes Q&A 7 PM
Concert 8 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Amanda Woodbury, soprano
Taylor Raven, mezzo-soprano
Jack Swanson, tenor
Chris Kenney, baritone
Bard Festival Chorale
James Bagwell, choral director
W.F. Bach: Erzittert und Fallet (Oh, Tremble and Falter)
J.C.F. Bach: Die Amerikanerin (The American)
J.C. Bach: Symphony in G minor, Op. 6, No. 6
C.P.E. Bach: Magnificat

These rarely-performed works by four of J.S. Bach’s sons showcase the compositional mastery the young men learned from their father, while also revealing how each was able to develop his own unique style. Wilhelm Friedemann’s music is closest to his father’s, while Carl Philipp Emanuel’s is more imaginative and expressive. Johann Christian’s music, on the other hand, is closer to the classical style of Mozart, although his earliest works are remarkably similar to Emanuel’s. Johann Christoph Friedrich’s compositional style resembles those of both Emanuel and Christian.

The soloists are soprano Amanda Woodbury, now in her fifth season at the Metropolitan Opera; mezzo-soprano Taylor Raven, who recently made her solo debut with the LA Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl; 2018 Richard Tucker Career Grant Winner, tenor Jack Swanson; and baritone Chris Kenney, a three-time winner of the Metropolitan Opera National Council District Auditions.

Tickets, priced at $25–$50, go on sale September 3 at lincolncenter.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or visiting the Alice Tully Hall box office at Broadway and 65th St.

Beyond Beethoven
Friday, January 31, 2020 at Carnegie Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Conductor’s Notes Q&A 7 PM
Concert 8 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Lucas Debargue, piano
Louis Spohr: Symphony No. 6, “Historical Symphony”
Galina Ustvolskaya: Piano Concerto
Franz Liszt: Fantasy on Motifs from Beethoven’s Ruins of Athens
Max Reger: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Beethoven

In honor of the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth, the ASO investigates how his music inspired others, from Liszt’s fantasia on the “Turkish March” to Spohr’s Beethovenesque scherzo and Reger’s variations on a bagatelle theme, where he displays his mastery of complex compositional techniques and pays homage to his distinguished predecessors. The program also celebrates the 100th anniversary of an often-overlooked 20th-century master, Galina Ustvolskaya. Her Piano Concerto is considered her first composition and demands the listener’s ear with a passionate, rhythmic motive that is repeated by the piano until the closing chord. French pianist Lucas Debargue is the soloist. He was the only musician at the 2015 International Tchaikovsky Competition awarded with the Moscow Music Critic’s Prize as a pianist whose “incredible gift, artistic vision, and creative freedom have impressed the critics as well as the audience.”

Tickets, priced at $25–$65, go on sale September 3 at carnegiehall.org, CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800 or the box office at 57th St & 7th Ave.

Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5
Sunday, February 2, 2020 at 4 PM at Peter Norton Symphony Space
Leon Botstein, conductor
Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 5

After a four-year hiatus, the ASO brings back its Symphony Space series, which integrates complete performances of familiar orchestral works with interactive educational demonstrations. The program will present Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, in conjunction with the Orchestra’s celebration of the composer’s 250th birthday. Music director Leon Botstein will open the afternoon with a lecture-demonstration that explains the cultural context and key themes of the work through a series of musical demonstrations played by the Orchestra. After intermission, the piece will be performed in its entirety, followed by a Q&A session with the audience.

Tickets, priced at $25-$40, go on sale September 3 at symphonyspace.org, 212.864.5400 or the box office on Broadway & 95th St.

Duke Ellington
Thursday, March 12, 2020 at Carnegie Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Conductor’s Notes Q&A 7 PM
Concert 8 PM
Leon Botstein, conductor
Marcus Roberts Trio
Marcus Roberts, piano
Rodney Jordan, bass
Jason Marsalis, drums
Catherine Russell, singer (special guest appearance)
Three Black Kings (Arr. Marcus Roberts)
New World A-Comin’ (Arr. Marcus Roberts)
Satin Doll
Harlem
Sophisticated Lady
Night Creature for Jazz Band and Orchestra
Black, Brown and Beige Suite

The ASO culminates its 2019-20 season with a tribute to Duke Ellington on the stage of Carnegie Hall, where Ellington played a series of annual concerts and premiered many of his greatest works, including Black, Brown, and Beige and New World A-Comin’. Ellington’s musical style employed a unique combination of classical and jazz compositional techniques that utilized improvisation over written composition, making him one of the most influential jazz composers of all time. Although he considered his compositions “beyond category” and he never defined himself as a jazz composer, his instrumental combinations, improvisation, and jazz arranging brought the world a notable American sound that can be heard in works like Sophisticated Lady and Harlem. His symphonic suite Three Black Kings displays his focus on musical form and jazz composition. He said his aim in writing Night Creature—which premiered at Carnegie Hall in 1955—was “to try to make the symphony swing.”

Marcus Roberts revolutionizes the Jazz trio format by making all three instruments equal partners in an ongoing conversation. His method of writing for trio and orchestra is to blend the two ensembles, the often disparate worlds of Jazz and Classical they each represent, and their contrasting approaches of improvisational vs. written music-making, into a collage that is uniquely and unmistakably American. Grammy-Award winning American vocalist Catherine Russell will join the evening in a special guest appearance.

Tickets, priced at $25–$65, go on sale September 3 at carnegiehall.org, CarnegieCharge at 212.247.7800 or the box office at 57th St & 7th Ave.

American Symphony Orchestra
The American Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1962 by Leopold Stokowski with a mission of making orchestral music accessible and affordable for everyone. Music Director Leon Botstein expanded that mission when he joined the ASO in 1992, creating thematic concerts that explore music from the perspective of the visual arts, literature, religion, and history, and reviving rarely-performed works audiences would otherwise seldom hear performed live.

The Orchestra has made several tours of Asia and Europe and performed in countless benefits for organizations including the Jerusalem Foundation and PBS. Many of the world’s most accomplished soloists have performed with the ASO, including Yo-Yo Ma, Deborah Voigt, and Sarah Chang. The Orchestra has released several recordings on the Telarc, New World, Bridge, Koch, and Vanguard labels, and numerous live performances are also available for digital download. In many cases, these are the only recordings of some of the rare works that have been rediscovered in ASO performances.

Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein has been music director and principal conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra since 1992. He is also music director of The Orchestra Now, an innovative training orchestra composed of top musicians from around the world. He is co-artistic director of Bard SummerScape and the Bard Music Festival, which take place at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, where he has been president since 1975. He is also conductor laureate of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, where he served as music director from 2003–11. In 2018, he assumed artistic directorship of Campus Grafenegg and Grafenegg Academy in Austria. Mr. Botstein also has an active career as a guest conductor with orchestras around the globe, and has made numerous recordings, as well as being a prolific author and music historian. He is the recipient of numerous honors for his contributions to the music industry. In 2019, The New York Times named Leon Botstein a “champion of overlooked works…who has tirelessly worked to bring to light worthy scores by neglected composers.”

For more information, please visit americansymphony.org.

Media Contact
Pascal Nadon
Pascal Nadon Communications
Phone: 646.234.7088
Email: pascal@pascalnadon.com

Martinů and Julietta

by Leon Botstein

Written for the concert The Key of Dreams, which was performed on March 22, 2019 at Carnegie Hall.

The career of Bohuslav Martinů mirrors the decisive and tragic character of the century in which he lived. Martinů was born in 1890 and came of age as a citizen of a multinational dynastic empire, only to find himself, in his twenties, a patriot of a newly minted national unit: Czechoslovakia. The triumphant nationalism of post-World War I Europe coexisted, however, with a profound sense of cultural discontinuity, a resistance to the claims of late nineteenth-century romanticism, and an internationalist sense of modernity. Martinů chose to become an expatriate artist in Paris, but the Prague-Paris axis vanished when he was forced into exile in America on account of fascism, the dismemberment of Czechoslovakia, and a second world war. He died in exile, caught in the Cold War in which his homeland had become a Soviet satellite. Martinů’s music registers the tensions, ambiguities, and ambivalences that inevitably surrounded the writing of original music by a composer caught in the crosscurrents created by the invention of a new nation, the technological transformation of sound reproduction, the carnage of World War II, the display of a uniquely modern barbarism in Europe, the nuclear age, and the psychic toll of involuntary, as well as self-imposed, exile.

In the young, flourishing, nationalist environment in which he grew up, Martinů demonstrated remarkable gifts and quickly was poised to inherit the mantle of a distinctive Czech nationalist tradition—understood in the terms of the late nineteenth century—in the musical culture bequeathed by Bedřich Smetana and Antonín Dvořák. The 1919 re-drawing of the map of Europe according to notions of self-determination may have created independent and relatively homogeneous political nation states, particularly when compared with the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but at the same time, a countercurrent of internationalist ideals in culture and politics emerged that redefined the cosmopolitan and re-imagined its aesthetic possibilities. For this reason, in the early 1920s, Martinů settled in Paris.

Paris between the two world wars became the center of transnational movements in dance, theater, painting, and music. Arthur Honegger, Francis Poulenc, Maurice Ravel, Igor Stravinsky, and Sergei Prokofiev dominated the scene. Whereas the much older Leoš Janáček drew strength and inspiration from the new Czechoslovak republic, Martinů gravitated toward an international style. Even so, although he settled in Paris and French became his second language, Martinů did not sever his ties to the nascent national entity, the Czechoslovakia of Tomáš Masaryk. Martinů in this way resembled his nearest Polish contemporary, Karol Szymanowski. They both balanced their experiences in cosmopolitan Paris with an increasingly romanticized but limited construct of the native homeland to which they felt allegiance. Consequently, even though Martinů experimented with a variety of widespread, fashionable, international approaches to composition, the Czech language and Bohemian materials were never entirely neglected. As the composition and performance history of Julietta suggest, a delicate balance was continually in play. This opera derived from a French novel that then was turned into a Czech libretto by the composer. It premiered in Prague, only to be retranslated back into French later on. But the subject transcends culture; it is not tied to any particular nativist traditions. What distinguished Martinů from Szymanowski, however, was his exceptional compositional facility and productivity. Of his near contemporaries, perhaps only Darius Milhaud was as prolific; but Martinů’s output was better crafted and more consistent than Milhaud’s, and more of it will remain in the repertory.

Martinů fled to America in 1941. Here he came to the attention of Aaron Copland, who brought him to Tanglewood. Though Martinů enjoyed the support of old friends, among them George Szell, Rudolf Firkusny, and Walter Susskind, America never seemed quite right. He never fit in; moody and reclusive, Martinů was not happy. To make matters worse, Communist Czecholsovakia was anathema. Martinů returned to Europe in the 1950s and spent the final years of his life in Switzerland.

Martinů is now increasingly known for his orchestral music, which includes six symphonies, but it is the field of opera that preoccupied him most. In this he resembled the ambitions of the older Czech role models and masters: Dvořák, Smetana, and Janáček. Julietta is widely regarded as the finest and most daring of Martinů’s sixteen operas. Its story line and libretto fit the period of its creation perhaps a bit too neatly, making quick comparisons to Franz Kafka and Sigmund Freud easy. But the score has also been the object of all too facile critical dismissal; it has been described as hard to like, episodic, too dependent on one character, attractive but not memorable. Indeed, Julietta has never been a true success, whether on the stage or in recording, despite several recent and highly praised revivals, including one in Berlin.

Given the evident and long-overdue Martinů revival now underway, particularly with regard to the instrumental and symphonic music, the operas demand a new look. And that suggests that Martinů’s most celebrated and most uniquely twentieth-century opera, in terms of subject and plot, merits a hearing in the United States. The faint praise and condescending rehearsal of the so-called shortcomings of Julietta demand rebuttal through performance. That places it squarely in the mission of the American Symphony Orchestra. There is ample reason to suspect that the time for Julietta has now come, and that it has languished too long. Julietta deserves a place in the repertory of our opera houses as one of the great twentieth-century operas. It is, in my view, an operatic masterpiece.

Julietta, or Symphonic Music is a Sometime Thing

by Jon Meadow and Michael Beckerman

Written for the concert The Key of Dreams, which was performed on March 22, 2019 at Carnegie Hall.

Born December 8, 1890, in Polička, Czechoslovakia
Died August 28, 1959, in Liestal, Switzerland
Composed in 1936–37
Premiered on March 16, 1938, in Prague, at the National Theatre, conducted by Václav Talich
Performance Time: Approximately 3 hours including intermission

Introductions and Possible Bright Futures

On March 16, 1938, inside the hallowed walls of Prague’s National Theatre, Czechoslovak composer Bohuslav Martinů’s three-act lyric opera Julietta (Snář) [Juliette, or the Key of Dreams] made its successful debut. Audience members immediately recognized the power, warmth, and economy of means of Julietta’s often “jazzy” and undulatory music. The premiere’s conductor, Václav Talich, judged Julietta to be one of Martinů’s “creative peaks.” Similarly, many years later, on his death bed, the composer showed his estimation of the work’s quality by retranslating the libretto back into French. Like Antonín Dvořák’s Rusalka (1901) or Leoš Janáček’s The Makopulos Case (1926), the opera maintains an iconic status in the Czech Republic, and the work’s reputation has resulted in several excellent, commercially available recordings, a growing body of related scholarship, and an international proliferation of new and innovative productions outside of Martinů’s homeland, such as the English National Opera staging in 2012 and Oper Frankfurt’s 2014 production.

Musical Recognitions

Julietta is the story of a Parisian bookseller’s (Michel) pursuit of an elusive girl (Julietta) in a seaside town. Given the libretto’s oceanside setting, games of chance, sailors, peddlers of “narcotics,” and the elusiveness of its namesake, it is not entirely unreasonable to think that a discussion of Julietta in light of some of its musical similarities to one of opera’s most provocative and notorious coastal works, George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess (1935), might yield something of consequence.

First, Julietta’s raw musical materials occasionally evoke Porgy’s. It is uncertain whether, when he started composing Julietta in May of 1936, Martinů knew the music (and stories) of Gershwin’s opera about a disabled gambling beggar living in an African-American tenement house on the South Carolina coast. However, as the echoes of Rhapsody in Blue (1924) in Julietta’s shopkeeper scene (Act I, scene ii) and the ostinati, syncopations, and accents of the orchestral interlude from Julietta and Michel’s meeting in the woods (Act II, scene v) attest, the composer was certainly no stranger to Gershwin’s globetrotting Jazz Age musical style more broadly. Moreover, even though Martinů had suspended his use of Jazz Age musical commonplaces at the start of the 1930s, his familiarity with Gershwin-esque music is as palpable in stage-works from the previous decade—like 1927’s Kitchen Revue and 1929’s three-act French-language film-opera Three Wishes, or Inconstancy of Life—as it is in select portions of Julietta.

Second, the way that Martinů thought about how symphonic music should interact with actions and words in Julietta shares assumptions with how Gershwin approached Porgy’s symphonic music. Around the summer of 1936, Martinů was able to secure Prague’s grand, late 19th-century National Theatre for Julietta’s premiere. Perhaps the nature of the venue emboldened him to bring into play the elsewhere, or rather the “elsewhen,” of the previous century, from which he salvaged a vaguely (Richard) Wagnerian manner of thinking about symphonic music’s interaction with words and actions that he had jettisoned in the interwar period. In his influential essay The Artwork of the Future (1849), Wagner had summarized the basic ideas of this late 19th-century way of thinking when he claimed that music’s historical progression necessitated that abstract, or absolute, symphonic music, which Wagner figured as a “vast, shoreless ocean” between words and action, would find itself superseded by a symphonic music that resembles a “bridge between [words and action].” Prior to Julietta or Porgy, Martinů and Gershwin had preferred the genres that made Wagner’s manner of thinking obsolete in many interwar circles, because similar to Gershwin with his pre-Porgy Broadway revues and one-act, hokum-filled opera Blue Monday (1922), Martinů had demonstrated a fondness for the one-act opera genre and the revue format with their looser, less-stringent relations between symphonic music and the libretto’s actions and words. Cases in point are stage works like the aforementioned Kitchen Revue, the one-act radio opera The Voice of the Forest (1935), and the prizewinning collection of one-act, Czech-language, neo-medieval opera-ballets The Plays of Mary (Premiered in Brno in 1935). In these pre-Julietta stage works, the manner in which symphonic music reinforces the actions and words of Julietta and Porgy can hardly be found.

Musical Misrecognitions and the Question of Leitmotifs

Regardless of their coastal settings, their common fund of situations and vocational types, the occasional similarity and contemporaneity of their musical “raw” materials, and their composers’ comparable manners of thinking about symphonic music’s role in opera, Julietta and Porgy’s librettos are dissimilar: they treat memory and the laws of physics differently, and their plots locate reality in disparate places and times.

On the one hand, Porgy’s “realist” libretto has a plot with a beginning, middle, and end, and its characters are subject to the laws of physics. This is a realm where bodies expire, and people are unable to bend spoons with their minds. This is the domain of the daytime. Also, the libretto’s words and actions have consequences and accrue meaning across all three acts. Memory, whether of the law, the individual, the community, a song, or a leitmotif, is essential to Porgy and Bess.

On the other hand, Michel’s “surreal” pursuit of who (or what) possibly exists behind an adulterated memory of a song fragment begins in medias res and unfolds moment by moment. The sequences of its situations across acts is not additive; its words (while clearly sung) have different inter-act, intra-act, and even intra-scene meanings, and the consequences of its characters’ actions are either suspended in ambiguity or they are cartoon-like in their denial of the laws of physics. This is the domain of nighttime, where and when memory is elusive.

After accounting for these differences, it stands to reason that the action- and word-reinforcing symphonic musics of librettos that have such dissimilar conceptions of reality, memory, and physical necessity are going to unfold in grossly dissimilar ways across three long acts. Because Gershwin both settles on Porgy’s “realistic” libretto and reverts to a late 19th-century call for symphonic music to reinforce words and action, he is emboldened to weave a network of Wagnerian leitmotifs from and through memorable songs and choral ensembles, and this enables him to ensure that every musical decision of Porgy and Bess will reinforce the drive towards the opera’s end, which is also the beginning of Porgy’s quest for the elusive Bess. Even Jasbo Brown’s often-cut onstage piano blues from Porgy’s opening scene provides ambiance and assists in orienting the audience in Catfish Row’s here and now, which is logically connected to its before and later.

This kind of practice finds no resonance in Julietta’s symphonic music. Throughout Julietta, Martinů employs the orchestra to provide unconventional but skillfully crafted and concretely shaped local operatic forms. Occasionally Martinů repeats melodic figures and sonorities that are appropriately associated in some vague, non-conceptual way with the elusive Julietta, and from time to time Martinů will repeat each act’s prelude whole cloth.  However, because the words and the actions of the libretto do not drive toward some univocal, unanimous meaning across all three acts, the symphonic music—because it is acting in accordance with the manner of thinking that Martinů adopted for the grand occasion of Julietta’s National Theater premiere—has no need for the coalescence of leitmotifs across all three acts.

In the end, it will be up to the listener to discover whether, despite this unreality, or perhaps because of it, Julietta, far from disappearing into the morass of non-memory, actually takes on a corporeality of enormous power.  We may imagine, then, that the “miracle” of Julietta, thinking back to Martinů’s previous opera, The Plays of Mary, is that in Martinů’s capable hands, absence becomes presence, dreams become true, and the lack of recall creates indelible operatic memories.

Jon Meadow is a Ph.D. student in Historical Musicology at New York University. His work is focused on the roles of humor and comedy in Bohuslav Martinů’s Great Depression theatre reforms.

Michael Beckerman is the Carroll and Milton Petrie Professor of Music at New York University. He is the author of numerous articles and books about Czech music.

Rebecca Jo Loeb, mezzo-soprano

Rebecca Jo Loeb
Photo by Ralph Rühmeier

Appeared in the concert The Key of Dreams, which was performed on March 22, 2019 at Carnegie Hall.

Rebecca Jo Loeb debuts with Los Angeles Opera and Beth Morrison Projects as Lumee in the world premiere of Ellen Reid’s Prism in the 2018-19 season. She also returns to the Deutsche Oper Berlin for a staged production of Schönberg’s Pierrot Lunaire and Frasquita in Carmen, and to the New York Festival of Song to reprise Bernstein’s Arias and Barcarolles on tour to Boston and New Hampshire this season. Last season, she debuted with the Teatro Municipal de Santiago (Gymnasiast/ein Groom in Lulu) and Theater Freiburg (Susan in Love Life) and returned to the Deutsche Oper Berlin (Zweite Magd in Elektra) and New York Festival of Song (Bernstein’s Arias and Barcarolles) on tour.

Ms. Loeb spent five seasons as an ensemble member of the Deutsche Oper Berlin and Hamburgische Staatsoper, where her performances included Cherubino in Le nozze di Figaro, Rosina in Il barbiere di Siviglia, Siebel in Faust, Hänsel in Hänsel und Gretel, Orlofsky in Die Fledermaus, and the Fox in The Cunning Little Vixen. Following her performances of Bellante in Handel’s Almira in Hamburg, she reprised the role at the Innsbrucker Festwochen der alten Musik.

Other recent engagements include joining the Metropolitan Opera (Flora in La traviata); Oper Köln (Fox in The Cunning Little Vixen); Dutch National Opera (Eine Theater Garderoberie/Gymnasiast/ein Groom in Lulu); Festival d’Aix-en-Provence (Second Angel/Marie in Written on Skin); and Dallas Opera (Fyodor in Boris Godunov).

Spring 2019

Philip Cokorinos, bass-baritone

Philip Cokorinos
Photo by Sarah Shatz

Appeared in the concert The Key of Dreams, which was performed on March 22, 2019 at Carnegie Hall.

Philip Cokorinos was winner of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions in 1985 and went on to sing his debut during the Metropolitan Opera’s 1987–88 season. Since then, he has appeared in more than 400 performances of 40 operas at the Metropolitan Opera, including “Live from The Met” telecasts of Don Giovanni; the world premiere of The Ghosts of Versailles; and The Met’s premieres of SlyCyrano de Bergerac, The Gambler, and Shostakovich’s opera Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk. He has also appeared in their productions of ToscaLa bohèmeLa fanciulla del WestLa traviataAdriana LecouvreurLa rondine, Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, Macbeth, ManonDon Carlo, Tosca, Il barbiere di Siviglia, Manon Lescaut, and Le Nozze di Figaro.

His recent appearances include several The Metropolitan Opera Live in HD broadcasts including ManonLa fanciulla del WestThe NoseWertherManon Lescaut, Le Nozze di Figaro, La bohème and Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk. This season, Mr. Cokorinos returns to the Metropolitan Opera for productions of La bohème and Adriana Lecouvreur, and to perform Billy Jackrabbit in La fanciulla del West, Amantio in Gianni Schicchi, and Sacristan in Tosca. He will also perform as 2nd Nazarene in Salome with the Spoleto Festival USA.

Spring 2019